Peace Day Parade: Held Locally, Seen Globally

Peace Day Parade: Held Locally, Seen Globally

We recently heard this statement on the local news: “It’s a lot harder fixing a broken adult than it is educating a receptive child”. While understandably controversial, in essence, it’s true. Steering a child down the right path is the best shot we have at making our future bright and prosperous. Before we start sounding like a Jack Johnson song, we’d like to share a wonderful, locally-based contest for kids around the world—surrounding the United Nations International Day of Peace, and the 4th annual parade and festival to commemorate it, to be held in Honokaa on September 19.

Open to all youth—nationwide—kids from kindergarten through twelfth grade are invited to design their version of a “Peace Day Poster”; the winners of which will be awarded cash prizes in four age categories. A grand prize winner will be awarded $100 plus a one-night stay (with their parents) at the Waianuhea Bed & Breakfast in Ahualoa.

“We are reaching out to all educators, in Hawaii, on the mainland and around the world, to use this contest as an opportunity for student dialog,” says contest organizer Cindy Navarro-Bowman, who teaches at Honokaa High School.  “The U.N. theme has inspired us to reflect on the role youth play in creating a peaceful future, and our hope is that kids everywhere will send their artwork to Hawaii for Peace Day.”

Details on how to enter the contest are available at the Peace Day Parade web site; entrants must submit before 6:00 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 10, 2010. There is no entry fee.

The Honokaa (on Big Island) festivities begin at 11:00 a.m. with a “moving stage” parade down Mamane Street which features Taiko drummers, high school marching bands, cirque performers, a jazz band, hula dancers and more. The parade ends at noon at the County Sports Complex, where the community festival begins, featuring local and ethnic food vendors, crafts and more live music.

Expected to draw over 2,000 participants, the Peace Day parade and festival will be video-streamed online, adding the potential to have millions of viewers from around the globe.

A FUN ASIDE: The United Nations has celebrated Peace Day annually since September 21, 1982. In 2007, the United Federation of the Junior Young Buddhists Associations successfully lobbied the Hawaii state legislature to establish a permanent Peace Day in the State of Hawaii. This year’s festival is presented by the Peace Committee of the Honokaa Hongwanji Buddhist Temple in cooperation with the United Nations and numerous community organizations.

Visit the Peace Day Parade web site for more information.

Expected to draw over 2,000 participants, the Peace Day parade and festival will be video-streamed online, adding the potential to have millions of viewers from around the globe.