GM + Pals Pledge to Bring Hydro-Powered Autos within 4 Years

GM + Pals Pledge to Bring Hydro-Powered Autos within 4 Years

A ground-breaking, recent coalition involving ten companies, agencies and universities have banded together to make hydrogen-powered vehicles—and 25 stations to fill them—a reality in Hawaii by 2015. In four short years, the leading company behind the effort, General Motors (GM), aims to kick off plans for a new sustainable energy ecosystem in Hawaii.

Called the Hawaii Hydrogen Initiative (H2I), the initiative will only be available on Oahu, for starters. GM will join forces with The Gas Company, the state's Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, U.S. Dept. of Energy, FuelCell Energy, Aloha Petroleum Litd., U.S. Pacific Command, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of California at Irvine and the University of Hawaii, to name a few.

TGC currently produced enough hydrogen to power up to 10,000 fuel cell vehicles, and has the capabilities of producing far more. GM is a leader in U.S. hydrogen fuel cell vehicle technology, having demonstrated a fleet of 100 vehicles as early as 2007.

“Once the key hydrogen infrastructure elements are proven in Hawaii, other states can adopt similar approaches,” said Charles Freese, executive director of GM Fuel Cell Activities. “Germany, Japan and Korea are all building hydrogen infrastructures within this same timeframe. The work in Hawaii can provide a template for other regions.”

“Hawaii is on the cutting edge of developing the infrastructure for hydrogen-powered vehicles and adopting the latest clean energy technologies to move our islands toward energy independence and sustainability,” said Richard Lim, acting director, state Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism. “H2I is a unique, innovative partnership that has brought together public, private and community partners to improve the quality of life for our citizens and become a worldwide model.”

TGC currently produced enough hydrogen to power up to 10,000 fuel cell vehicles, and has the capabilities of producing far more. GM is a leader in U.S. hydrogen fuel cell vehicle technology, having demonstrated a fleet of 100 vehicles as early as 2007.